Tag Archives: Holiday

Film on TV: May 11-17

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The Third Man, playing on TCM, May 15th at 10:45am

As always, if I didn’t write anything for a film, it’s usually because I’ve pitched it in earlier posts. Use the tags at the bottom to find earlier posts regarding the same film if you so desire.

Monday, May 11th

4:15am (12th) – TCM – Network
Newscaster Peter Finch is as mad as hell and he’s not going to take it anymore. To see why, watch this incendiary unmasking of the ruthless world of network television. And this was 1976. Think what it’s like now!

Tuesday, May 12th

6:30am – TCM – Little Women (1933)
Katharine Hepburn is Jo March in this early adaptation of Alcott’s classic novel. There’s a bit of creak to this one, but Hepburn is luminous. I grew up with this one, so I have a special place in my heart for it, as well.

9:45am – TCM – Holiday
Kate Hepburn teams up with Cary Grant for their second film (TCM is playing all their pairings except the first, Sylvia Scarlet, for some reason) – this is the same year as Bringing Up Baby and has been overshadowed by it, but Holiday is also well worth a look.

11:30am – TCM – Bringing Up Baby
Must See

1:15pm – TCM – The Philadelphia Story
Hepburn here is Tracy Lord, a spoiled socialite about to marry Ralph Bellamy when ex-husband Cary Grant turns up. Throw in newspaper columnist James Stewart and his photographer Ruth Hussey, along with a bunch of great character actors filling out the cast, and you have both rollicking wedding preparations and one of the best films ever made.
Must See

5:30pm – TCM – The Lion in Winter

Wednesday, May 13th

10:45am – TCM – I Know Where I’m Going!
This is one of those films you probably haven’t heard of, doesn’t get much press, is very quiet and unassuming, but once you watch it you won’t easily forget it. Wendy Hiller is a confident young woman who knows exactly what she wants and where she’s going – that is, to meet her wealthy fiance and marry him on one of the Scottish Hebrides. But when a storm strands her on the way, she finds herself thrown off-course in more ways than one. There’s nothing wasted here, and I Know Where I’m Going! stands as one of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s crowning achievements, even if it’s not as well-known as Black Narcissus or The Red Shoes.

5:45pm – TCM – I Could Go On Singing
I haven’t actually seen this one, but it’s Judy Garland’s final film. So there’s that. Also, TCM is apparently doing a series of films today that start with “I” – which is just an interesting approach to programming. :)

Thursday, May 14th

5:00am – TCM – Dinner At Eight

7:00am – TCM – Remember the Night
Not a great film, this one, but it has Barbara Stanwyck, who always managed to transcend her material and make whatever she was in worth watching. This is no exception.

8:45am – TCM – The Letter
Bette Davis shoots a man on her front porch. But…is it self-defense? Murder? Something else? Classic melodrama on display here.

12:45pm – TCM – Anna Christie
Garbo Talks. And thus, silent screen superstar Greta Garbo leapt into the sound era. (Disclaimer: I haven’t seen this one, either. But it has the tagline Garbo Talks. I have to work that in.)

5:45pm – TCM – The Women
Only the cattiest, most man-less film every made. :) Several of Hollywood’s greatest female stars, from established divas like Norma Shearer and Joan Crawford to up-and-comers like Rosalind Russell and Joan Fontaine to character actresses like Mary Boland and Marjorie Main (and even non-actresses like gossip columnist Hedda Hopper), give their all to one of the wittiest scripts ever written. It’s tremendous fun every time I see it. And I’ve seen it like ten or fifteen times.
Must See

10:00pm – IFC – Blue Velvet
(repeats at 3:15am on the 15th)

Friday, May 15th

7:15am – TCM – Shadow of a Doubt
Must See

9:25am – IFC – Primer
(repeats at 2:35pm)

10:45am – TCM – The Third Man
Carol Reed directs Orson Welles and Joseph Cotten in a Graham Greene script with a film noir style that seems to point directly toward European filmmaking styles of the 1950s and 1960s. Can’t be beat, I tell you. Can’t.
Must See

9:30pm – IFC – The Proposition
Australia’s answer to the western; Guy Pearce must hunt down and capture his brothers for the law in order to save his own skin. Gritty and violent almost to a fault, but it definitely brought new life to the Western genre – maybe it’s finally due to recover in the 2000s?
(repeats at 3:00am on the 16th)

Saturday, May 16th

6:00am – TCM – Murder!
Best.Title.Ever for a Hitchcock film, right down to the included exclamation point. :) It’s an early Hitchcock, one of his first sound pictures.

Sunday, May 17th

9:45am – IFC – Far From Heaven
Director Todd Haynes homages 1950s melodrama king Douglas Sirk with this film, loosely based on Sirk’s All That Heaven Allows. I don’t think he succeeded as well as he might’ve (Sirk’s sort of in a class by himself), but he and lead Julianne Moore make a darn good attempt.
(repeats at 2:15pm)

11:30am – TCM – Double Indemnity
Must See

6:00pm – TCM – In the Heat of the Night
Northern police officer Sidney Poitier is brought in to aid racist small-town cop Rod Steiger. It’s 1967. You think sparks aren’t gonna fly from that? Come on. Steiger won an Oscar.

Film on TV: March 16-23

Monday, March 16

5:00am – TCM – Henri Langlois: Phantom of the Cinematheque
If you like American film since about 1970 or French film since the 1950s, then take a minute to thank Henri Langlois, founder of the Cinematheque Française in Paris. He showed American films from the 1940s, Italian Neo-Realist films, European artsy films, anything he could get his hands on, and fed a love of cinema to the writers and filmmakers who would lead the Nouvelle Vague in France, which in turn would influence the New Hollywood of the ’70s. Without Langlois, there’s no Truffaut, no Godard, no Chabrol, no Rivette, but also no Scorsese, no Bogdanovich, no Coppola, etc. This fascinating documentary follows the ups and downs of the great cinematic hero.

2:30pm – IFC – Raging Bull

8:00pm – TCM – The Navigator
I can’t remember if I’ve seen this Buster Keaton film or not, but it’s Buster Keaton. Therefore it’s worthwhile.

9:30pm – TCM – The Brain That Wouldn’t Die
A cult classic of the first degree. There’s even a Mystery Science Theatre 3000 version, if you’d rather seek that one out.

1:15am (17th) – TCM – Frenzy
One of Hitchcock’s last films, made in 1972 when many of the content rules had been lifted and he could be a lot more explicit than he previously could. And he is, in a somewhat lurid story of the Necktie Killer, a serial killer terrorizing London with failed rape attempts and successful murders.

Tuesday, March 17

6:45pm – IFC – A Hard Day’s Night
Sorta musical, sorta comedy, sorta documentary, sorta concert film, all Beatles, and all fantastic.
(repeats 7:50am and 1:30pm on the 18th)

8:00pm – TCM – The Quiet Man

Wednesday, March 18

8:15am – TCM – Holiday
Besides Bringing Up Baby, Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn also made this film in 1938, and though it isn’t as well known and possibly hasn’t aged as well, it’s still well worth watching, not least of all for the great supporting turns by Lew Ayres (All Quiet on the Western Front) and Gail Patrick.

10:00am – TCM – Top Hat

8:00pm – IFC – The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
(repeats 1:45am on the 19th)

10:00pm – IFC – The Royal Tenenbaums
(repeats 3:45am on the 19th)

12:00M – IFC – This Film Is Not Yet Rated
Documentary about the abuses of the MPAA ratings board gets a little sensationalist at times, but still manages to bring up very good points about the ratings system’s fallibility and arbitraryness.

Thursday, March 19

6:00am – TCM – Dark Victory

7:15am – IFC – Picnic at Hanging Rock
(repeats at 12:45pm)

6:05pm – Sundance – Avenue Montaigne

6:25pm – IFC – Trainspotting

9:30pm – IFC – Moulin Rouge!
(repeats 11:50 am on the 20th)

11:45pm – IFC – Dogville
Lars von Trier specializes in making difficult films, and Dogville is difficult both stylistically and thematically, and many people hate it. Love isn’t quite the right word for the emotion I have towards it, either, but it remains one of the most powerfully impactful films I’ve ever seen. Not to mention it has what is quite possibly Nicole Kidman’s greatest performance (and I love Nicole, so I don’t mean that sarcastically).

Friday, March 20

9:15am – TCM – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

4:15pm – TCM – Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

5:45pm – IFC – Stage Beauty
Sometime around Shakespeare’s time, theatrical convention changed from having all female parts played by males on stage to allowing women to perform female roles themselves. Caught in this shift were the effeminate men who had made their careers and indeed, their identities, out of playing women. Stage Beauty is about one such man and his crisis of self when he no longer had a professional or personal identity. It’s a fascinating film in many ways.

6:15pm – TCM – Freaky Friday (1978)
Jodie Foster as a kid who switches bodies with her mom! Gotta love it.

2:30am (21st) – TCM – Two-Lane Blacktop
Fiercely independent road picture – a sort of Easy Rider but with cars, less plot, and no stars.

Saturday, March 21

3:30pm – TCM – The Caine Mutiny

1:00am (22nd) – TCM – Oklahoma!

Sunday, March 22

6:00am – TCM – The Roaring Twenties
One of James Cagney’s classic gangster pictures.

8:00am – TCM – Angels With Dirty Faces
Another of James Cagney’s classic gangster pictures, this time with kids and a priest thrown in.

6:15pm – IFC – Wassup Rockers
I watched this last time it was on IFC, and quite liked it. Small, intimate little film about a group of teenage Latino skateboarders from South Central LA. They go up to Beverly Hills to skateboard, get caught by cops, escape, meet up with some girls, get in fights with preppy 90210 guys, and try to get home. But the moments that’ll get you are when they’re just talking, to the camera, or to the girls, about their life and what it’s like to live in South Central. The acceptance that one of their older friends was recently shot by a black gang, or the shy recounting of their last experience trying to find a girlfriend. It doesn’t go anywhere, really, but it’s a wonderful slice of life.

12:00M – TCM – Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans