Tag Archives: Jules et Jim

Film on TV: April 20-26th

Stage Door
Stage Door, playing at 1:45am on April 22 (TCM)

Monday, April 20th

11:00pm – TCM – Top Hat
Must See

12:45am (21st) – TCM – A Night at the Opera
The title of “Best Marx Brothers Film Ever” is pretty much a dead heat between this film and Duck Soup. I throw my vote to A Night at the Opera, though. Must See

2:30am (21st) – TCM – Dinner at Eight
MGM could put together a killer ensemble cast when they wanted to, and Dinner at Eight is one of the best early 1930s examples – John Barrymore, Wallace Beery, Jean Harlow, Billie Burke, Marie Dressler, and others – plus it’s seriously funny.

Tuesday, April 21st

8:00pm – TCM – The Women
Talk about your ensemble casts: Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rosalind Russell, Paulette Goddard, Joan Fontaine, Mary Boland, Virginia Weidler, Hedda Hopper, Marjorie Main, and not a man in sight. Add in one of the best (and most bitingly catty) scripts ever written, and you’ve got a film that always draws a huge audience when it’s revived. Not so much when it’s remade, though.

12:00M – TCM – Topper
Socialite couple Cary Grant and Constance Bennett take one inebriated drive too many and end up as ghosts. The fun starts when they decide to help Grant’s staid boss Cosmo Topper (Roland Young) learn to live a little. Screwball comedy meets the supernatural, and it’s a winner.

12:00M – IFC – Amores Perros

1:45am (22nd) – TCM – Stage Door
I cannot describe to you how much I love this film. I’m not sure it’s wholly rational. Katharine Hepburn plays an heiress who wants to make it on her own as an actress, so she moves (incognito) into a New York boarding house for aspiring actresses. Her roommate ends up being Ginger Rogers (who’s never been better or more acerbic), and the boarding house is rounded out with a young Lucille Ball, a young Eve Arden, a very young Ann Miller, and various others. The dialogue is crisp and everyone’s delivery matter-of-fact and perfectly timed, and the way the girls use humor to mask desperation makes most every moment simultaneously funny and tragic – so that when it does turn tragic, it doesn’t feel like a shift in mood, but a culmination of the inevitable. Dang, now I want to watch it RIGHT NOW. Must See

Wednesday, April 22nd

8:00am – IFC – Millions

1:15pm – TCM – Kiss Me Kate

11:00pm – TCM – The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek
Preston Sturges zaniest and most irreverent comedy gives Betty Hutton her best role as Trudy Kockenlocker, who goes out for a night on the town with a group of soldiers about to ship out. A few months later, she finds out she’s pregnant and can only vaguely remember an impromptu wedding ceremony with a soldier who may or may not be named Ratskiwatski. I’m always impressed that Sturges got away with as much as he did in this film in 1944.

Thursday, April 23rd

9:15am – IFC – Jules et Jim
(repeats at 2:35pm)

9:30am – TCM – The Adventures of Robin Hood
This is one of the first movies I can remember seeing. And all these years later, it remains one of the greatest adventure movies ever made. Errol Flynn was born to play Robin Hood, and Olivia de Havilland is a luminous Maid Marion. Also one of the first Technicolor films. Must See

11:30pm – IFC – Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
(repeats at 5:30am on the 24th)

3:45am (24th) – TCM – On the Town
Sailors on leave Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, and Jules Munshin hit New York City, spending the day sightseeing and searching for Kelly’s dream girl Vera-Ellen, meanwhile picking up Betty Garrett and Ann Miller for the other boys. Not much plot here, but enough to precipitate some of the best song and dance numbers on film. Also one of the first musicals shot on location. Must See

Friday, April 24th

4:15pm – TCM – The Trouble With Harry
Hitchcock’s films usually have some degree of macabre humor in them, but The Trouble With Harry is probably the funniest. Harry is dead. And everyone else in the film (including a young Shirley MacLaine) is trying to somehow hide his body, mostly unsuccessfully and with hilarious results.

Saturday, April 25th

8:00am – TCM – Yojimbo
Yojimbo gets talked about probably more than any of Akira Kurosawa’s samurai movies other than The Seven Samurai. Maybe Rashomon, if you count that as a samurai movie. But I haven’t seen it. Maybe this will be the time? We’ll see. :)

10:00am – TCM – The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

5:00pm – TCM – I Married a Monster from Outer Space
Okay, I have never heard of this movie, and I have NO IDEA what it is. But it is called I Married a Monster from Outer Space. How can it not be awesomely bad, and thus imminently worth watching?

10:45pm – TCM – The Lion in Winter
Kate Hepburn won an Oscar for her portrayal of Elinor of Aquitaine (wife of England’s Henry II and mother to Richard the Lionhearted and John I). Peter O’Toole handles Henry II with equal aplomb, and the two competitive brothers are Timothy Dalton and Anthony Hopkins in early roles. It’s a fascinating time in history to me, as well, and this is one of the better films that depicts it.

1:15am – TCM – Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1932)
Fredric March does right by the famous doctor and his alter-ego, though he did have a lot of help from makeup. ;)

3:00am – TCM – The Champ (1931)
Just saw this Wallace Beery pic a couple of months ago, and thought it was mighty solid. It’s much less of a boxing picture than I originally thought – much more about washed-up boxer Beery’s relationship with his tough-talking son Jackie Coogan, who’s fantastic in his part. It’s simple, but effective in its early 1930s Warner Bros. way.

Sunday, April 26th

8:00am – TCM – Dark Victory

12:00N – TCM – The Band Wagon
There are many reasons to consider The Band Wagon among the best movie musicals ever made. The satirical plot involving a Shakespearean director who tries to turn a lighthearted musical into a doom-and-gloom version of Faust, the bright yet sardonic script and score by Betty Comden and Adolph Green (who basically appear in the film as the characters played by Nanette Fabrey and Oscar Levant), the last really great role for Fred Astaire (maybe Funny Face is a contender, but barely), and of course, the never-surpassed beauty of dance numbers like “Dancing in the Dark” with Fred and Cyd Charisse. But even if it didn’t have all that, I’d still rank it among my favorites for the epic “Girl Hunt Ballet” number spoofing hard-boiled detective fiction. Must See

6:00pm – TCM – The Night of the Hunter
If there’s ever a film that defined “Southern gothic,” it’s this one. Underhanded “preacher” Robert Mitchum weasels his way into a young widowed family to try to gain the money the late father hid before he died. But what starts off as a well-done but fairly standard crime thriller turns into a surreal fable somewhere in the middle, and at that moment, jumps from “good film” to “film you will be able to get out of your NEVER.” In a good way. Must See

Film on TV: December 8-14

Monday, 8 December

None. Can you believe it?

Tuesday, 9 December

11:30am / 10:30am – TCM – The Bad and the Beautiful
TCM is running a Kirk Douglas festival, but including both The Bad and the Beautiful and Two Weeks in Another Town (at 6pm) makes a nice double feature of Douglas/Vincente Minnelli/Hollywood-on-Hollywood films. Gloria Grahame won her Best Supporting Oscar for this one.

1:05pm / 12:05pm – IFC – Les enfants du paradise (Children of Paradise)
A shy mime loves a popular actress in this classic French film set in the artsy district in Paris. This is one of the most magical, beautiful, captivating films I’ve ever seen. It’s almost three hours long, and it feels like half that.

6:00pm / 5:00pm – TCM – Two Weeks in Another Town
I haven’t actually seen this one, but as a post-Bad and the Beautiful Minnelli/Douglas collaboration, I want to.

6:15pm / 5:15pm – IFC – Garden State
Somehow it has apparently become fashionable to hate on Garden State, but I refuse. I love it, and I don’t think that’s going to change any time soon.

4:00am / 3:00am (9th) – IFC – The Cooler
In this under-the-radar film, William H. Macy plays a loser whose bad luck gets him a job as a “cooler” at a casino – his luck spreads and cools off any hot winning streaks that might be going on. But when he starts a relationship with Maria Bello, his new-found love and acceptance turns his luck. This film reinforced my knowledge of Bill Macy’s talent, introduced me to Maria Bello, and gave Alec Baldwin pretty his best role until 30 Rock.

Wednesday, 10 December

Nothing again! Wowsers.

Thursday, 11 December

8:30am / 7:30am – IFC – Strictly Ballroom
Baz Luhrmann’s Australia is now in theatres, and though I liked Australia quite a lot, it isn’t actually nearly as Australian as this first entry in his informal “Red Curtain” trilogy (the others being Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge!). Strictly Ballroom has a Latin dancer shaking up the world of Australian ballroom competition by introducing his own moves. The film is exuberant, colorful, in-your-face, and fabulous.

11:35am / 10:30am – IFC – A Hard Day’s Night
Part concert film, part documentary, and part musical comedy, Richard Lester’s film depicts a day in the life of The Beatles, at the height of the British Invasion in 1964. It’s like a breath of fresh air when compared with the over-produced, bloated monsters that most musicals had become in the 1960s, and remains one of the best music-centric films ever made.
(repeats at 6:25am EST on the 12th)

11:45pm / 10:45pm – TCM – High Society
This is not one of the best music-centric films ever made, but it is the musical version of The Philadelphia Story, with both Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra crooning it up with songs by Cole Porter. Oh, and one of Grace Kelly’s last roles before she retired to become a princess and stuff. Still, you wish with that pedigree that it were better than it is. Ah, well.

Friday, 12 December

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – Little Women (1933)
A repeat from last week, but mentioning it again because this time it’s followed by its 1949 remake. This is the Katharine Hepburn-led version.

10:00pm / 8:00pm – TCM – Little Women (1949)
And this is the June Allyson-led version, though it tends to be marketed now (when it’s marketed at all) as the Elizabeth Taylor version – she plays Amy. The interesting thing is that the 1933 version and the 1949 version have basically the same exact script. I mean, almost to the word. Yet, the 1933 version is actually good, and this one is mediocre at best. Watch both and tell me I’m wrong.

Saturday, 13 December

2:15pm / 1:15pm – TCM – Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
I dare anyone to watch Gentlemen Prefer Blondes all the way through (and Some Like It Hot) and tell me that Marilyn Monroe either was a dumb blonde or played only dumb blondes. Her Lorelei Lee seems like the quintessential airhead, but she’s not – it’s a highly calculated act. Similarly, the film seems like a total fluff piece, but I rank it among my favorite comedies of all time. Jane Russell is equally brilliant as Lorelei’s smart-alecky cohort, and Howard Hawks proves yet again that he can direct any genre and make it amazingly special.

4:00pm / 3:00pm – TCM – Christmas in Connecticut
Geez, Christmas is coming close fast. How does this happen every year? Barbara Stanwyck has a way of making even routine films seems special, and that’s what she does here (and in the next film, Remember the Night). She’s a popular columnist who writes about her wonderful family and cozy farm, which is all well and good except she hasn’t got a wonderful family or cozy farm, and her editor has invited himself and a lucky soldier over for Christmas to experience the great things she writes about. Madcap coverups ensue, and her falling for the soldier doesn’t serve to untangle matters at all.

6:00pm / 5:00pm – TCM – Remember the Night
Again, not really a great film, but Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray (four years pre-Double Indemnity) make it an enjoyable one. Then again, I did see it when I was in the midst of a super-Stanwyck-fan phase, so I might have a biased memory of it.

Sunday, 14 December

5:30am / 4:30am – TCM – Singin’ in the Rain
If you haven’t seen this potentially greatest movie musical of all time, DO IT NOW. If you have? WATCH IT AGAIN.

8:00am / 7:00am – IFC – Jules et Jim
Francois Truffaut directs this enigmatic love triangle of a film, as Jules and Jim have their close friendship threatened by their mutual love for the elusive Catherine (the ever-perfect Jeanne Moreau). I’m due for a rewatch on it myself; I expect I’ll get a lot more out of it now than I did when I saw it several years ago, with only one other Truffaut and no other New Wave films under my belt.

10:00pm / 9:00pm – Sundance – Adaptation
Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman followed Being John Malkovich with this film, which seems to be just as polarizing. In typical Kaufman-esque self-referentiality, Nicolas Cage plays a writer named Charlie Kaufman struggling to adapt a book to film. Adding to his difficulty is his doppelganger, Donald Kaufman, who writes blockbuster movies with ease. The film becomes an exploration of the adaptation process, as well as the Hollywoodization of screenplays. Many people think it falls apart toward the end, but I think it only seems to; in fact, what happens to Charlie’s sceenplay within the film happens TO the film as well. It’s trippy, but it’s brilliant.

2:15am / 1:15am (15th) – TCM – Das Boot
Another one I haven’t seen, but gets highly recommended to me quite often. Wolfgang Petersen’s most well-known pre-Hollywood film set aboard a submarine. Yeah, I really don’t know much more about it than that, but it routinely makes it onto “best non-English language film” type lists.

3:30am / 2:30am (15th) – IFC – Chicago
This is one of the films that started making movie musicals a viable genre again, and for that, I thank it. I also happen to like it quite a lot on its own terms.