Tag Archives: Paths of Glory

Film on TV: 15-21 December

Though I obviously recommend all these films (or I wouldn’t list them here), I’m going to start putting MUST-SEE on ones that I’d say you, well, must see. That is, if you aren’t able to catch them on TV this week, put them in your Netflix queue. Or buy them. Something.

Thanks to those of you who’ve mentioned liking these recommendations. If you do end up seeing any of them, it’d be fun to hear what you thought!

Monday, 15 December

10:30am EST / 9:30am CST – TCM – My Favorite Wife
Cary Grant and Irene Dunne made three films together, and though My Favorite Wife doesn’t hold a candle to their earlier outing The Awful Truth, it’s still an enjoyable screwball comedy, if you’re a fan of that sort of thing. Dunne returns to her husband Grant after seven years of being shipwrecked and believed dead, only to find him about to be remarried. Oh, and she’s brought fellow shipwreckee Randolph Scott with her.

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – Guys and Dolls
Marlon Brando gets his musical on as charming gambler Sky Masterson and romances straight-laced Jean Simmons as part of a bet – at first. But Frank Sinatra and Vivian Blaine steal the show as the city’s go-to craps game host and his long-suffering fiance.

9:00pm / 8:00pm – IFC – Trainspotting
Days in the lives of Scottish heroin addicts. Sounds like a downer, and I won’t say it’s not, but it’s also brilliant and searing. Danny Boyle is a director who can take stories that could be routine and make them into something special. His current film Slumdog Millionaire is getting rave reviews, so check that one out, too.
(repeats at 1:00am EST 16th)

10:45pm / 9:45pm – TCM – Hamlet (1948)
Is Laurence Olivier’s moody Dane the definitive Hamlet? I’m not sure, so take a look for yourself and get back to me.

Tuesday, 16 December

11:25am / 10:25am – IFC – Howl’s Moving Castle
Hayao Miyazaki has been a leader in the world of kid-friendly anime films for several years now, and while many would point to Spirited Away as his best film, I actually enjoyed Howl’s Moving Castle the most of all his films. Japanese animation takes some getting used to, but Miyazaki’s films are well worth it, and serve as a wonderful antidote to the current stagnation going on in American animation (always excepting Pixar).

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – Shadow of a Doubt
Said to be Hitchcock’s personal favorite of all of his films – an interesting choice, given the plethora of more iconic films from him, but Shadow of a Doubt definitely has its charms. The ever-great and too often underused Teresa Wright is young Charlie, who idolizes her namesake Uncle Charlie, who we know (though she does not) is the infamous Black Widow murderer.

12:00pm / 11:00pm – TCM – The Third Man
Orson Welles is the elusive Harry Lime in this intelligent thriller from director Carol Reed and screenwriter Graham Greene, Joseph Cotten the journalist trying to track him down. From the moody noir lighting to Lime’s ingenious monologue about power and cuckoo clocks, The Third Man is one of the greatest films of all time. MUST SEE

1:00am / 12:00pm (17th) – Sundance – Topsy-Turvy
Gilbert & Sullivan played a large part in the development of the musical comedy, and Topsy-Turvy details their tumultuous working relationship and their stage successes. This film flew under the radar a bit a few years ago, but got a fair amount of critical praise and deserves more play than it’s had.

Wednesday, 17 December

2:45pm / 1:45pm – TCM – The Apartment
Billy Wilder had a knack for combining comedy and drama into bittersweet goodness, and that’s exactly what he does here, garnering Oscars for Picture, Director, and Screenplay in the process. Jack Lemmon lends his apartment to his boss Fred MacMurray for romantic trysts – a situation that gets even more complicated when MacMurray trysts with Shirley MacLaine, who Lemmon happens to love from afar. Everything comes together perfectly in this film, one of Wilder’s best. MUST SEE

5:00pm / 4:00pm – TCM – The Great Escape
I expected to mildly enjoy or at least get through this POW escape film. What happened was I was completely enthralled with every second of it, from failed escape attempts to planning the ultimate escape to the dangers of carrying it out. It’s like a heist film in reverse, and extremely enjoyable in pretty much every way.

10:00pm / 9:00pm – Sundance – 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days
In case you hadn’t noticed, I pretty much think this film is the greatest thing since sliced bread. Okay, that might be a little much. (Or not, since I’m not really a sliced bread fan. But that’s by the by.) Anyway, I’ve hyped 4 Months just about every chance I’ve gotten, so why should I stop now? See it. See it now. Or, like, Wednesday at 10pm. MUST SEE

Thursday, 18 December

2:00pm / 1:00pm – TCM – Topkapi
If The Great Escape is the greatest example of a reverse heist film, then Topkapi is at least one of the top five actual heist films. I love me some heist films.

10:00pm / 9:00pm – TCM – 12 Angry Men
My dad is fond of pointing out that 12 Angry Men must’ve been one of the most economical movies to make ever, given that it basically only needed one set. And yet, watching and listening to twelve jurors debate the fate of one defendant accused of murder remains a riveting experience, even sixty years later.

Friday, 19 December

9:45am / 8:45am – TCM – Paths of Glory
In this early Stanley Kubrick film, Kirk Douglas argues against implacable military brass for the lives of his soldiers, accused of cowardice in battle because they refused to obey an idiotic order calling for a suicidal charge. I didn’t love it as much as I wanted to, but there are definitely a lot of interesting things going on – I particularly liked the exploration of the disconnect between old military tactics and new warfare reality (which is a particular favorite historical topic of mine, somehow, and likely the source of my fascination with World War I).

7:15pm / 6:15pm – IFC – The Player
I forget what all happens in this Robert Altman film. I remember it being good, except that Tim Robbins for some reason annoys me so I had a difficult time caring about his character, which was kind of a problem. So why did I put it on here? Because it has an amazing opening tracking shot, intentionally meant to beat the record for longest opening tracking shot but also serving as an extremely good introduction to the world of the Hollywood film studio within which the film is set.

9:30pm / 8:30pm – IFC – The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
This is the one Wes Anderson film I haven’t seen. I need to rectify that, because I LOVE everything else he’s done.

Saturday, 20 December

10:25am / 9:25am – IFC – Strictly Ballroom
The first in Baz Luhrmann’s informal Red Curtain trilogy, set in the world of Australian ballroom dancing, which gets shook up when one of the dancers dares to introduce *gasp* his own flavor of Latin dancing into the highly-regulated competition.
(repeats 3:15pm EST)

12:15pm / 11:15am – TCM – Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
Naive and idealistic James Stewart gets appointed junior senator at the behest of conniving senator Claude Rains, who expects to control the state with Stewart in his pocket. But Rains underestimated Stewart’s drive for goodness and justice, which leads to one of the most famous filibusters in cinematic (or probably real-life) history. Capra favorite Jean Arthur is on hand as the hardboiled cynic warmed by Stewart’s presence. MUST SEE

6:35pm / 5:35pm – IFC – Gosford Park
Murder, intrigue, and understated class strife rule the day in Altman’s foray into British drama, though he keeps his signature ensemble cast.
(repeats 1:15pm EST on the 21st)

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – You Can’t Take It With You
Capra again, with Stewart and Arthur again, this time as a newly affianced couple whose families – one conservative bankers, the other unconventional kooks – clash as they get to know each other.

10:00pm / 9:00pm – Sundance – All About My Mother
I have yet to see all of Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar’s films, but if he had just made this one, he’d go down as a master in my book. A mother loses her son in a car accident, and in the process of mourning him returns to her home town to reconnect with her past. Oh, and there’s a lot of theatre (the title is a take-off from theatre story All About Eve), a pregnant nun, and some transvestites. Par for the course for Almodovar, really, but All About My Mother has such heart and depth that I can’t help falling in love with it every time, due in no small part to a terrific performance by Cecilia Roth. MUST SEE

Sunday, 21 December

6:30am / 5:30am – TCM – The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
As far as I know, this is the only film Hitchcock made twice, directing a remake in 1956 with James Stewart and Doris Day. I actually haven’t seen the earlier version myself yet, but it has Peter Lorre in it, and that’s never a bad thing.

8:00am / 7:00am – TCM – Good News
If you’re the type of person who a) likes people randomly breaking out into song and b) is willing to believe that thirty-somethings June Allyson and Peter Lawford could be college students, you’ll probably like Good News. It’s mindless fun of the type MGM did so well, as braniac Allyson takes on the arduous task of tutoring jock Lawford in French. One of those that isn’t that great a film, but everyone seems to have had a lot of fun making it, and I’m willing to reciprocate by enjoying myself watching it.

1:15am / 12:15am (22nd) – TCM – Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1926)
Everyone knows about Charlton Heston’s Ben-Hur. You know, the one that won eleven Oscars, a record which stood for, like, fifty years? This isn’t that one. This is the 1926 silent version of the same story, with pre-talkie hearththrob Ramon Novarro as Ben-Hur, and an equally impressive (for its time) chariot race sequence. In some ways, I actually prefer this version to the bombastic 1959 version, and it’s definitely worth a watch.

3:45am / 2:45am (22nd) – TCM – The 400 Blows
Ah, Truffaut. Oh, The 400 Blows. Words can hardly describe how much I love this film, and what it has meant to me, cinematically speaking. It was the beginning of my love affair with the French New Wave, one of the first non-English films I whole-heartedly loved, and really opened up a whole world of filmic experience and critical thought to me. Beyond that, it’s a beautiful and unforgettable film in and of itself, a remarkably real, moving, and unmanipulative (okay, maybe a little manipulative) foray into the life of a young Parisian boy on the cusp of adulthood. Don’t miss it. MUST SEE

Film on TV (Nov 10 – 17)

Monday, 10 November

7:25pm EST / 6:25 CST – IFC – Clerks
Kevin Smith’s debut film is little more than a few convenience store clerks chatting, but its fresh feel fits right in with the mid-’90s indie scene. And the film introduces Smith stock characters Jay and Silent Bob, so there’s that.

Tuesday, 11 November

7:55am / 6:55am – IFC – Solaris (1972)
The original Andrei Tarkovsky version, not the George Clooney remake. I haven’t seen either, but I’ve heard really great things about the Tarkovsky, and it’s on my to-watch list.

12:15pm / 11:15am – AMC – The Bridge on the River Kwai
British military discipline in the form of commander Alec Guinness doesn’t mesh well with being in a WWII Japanese prison camp – or maybe it does, as Guinness puts his all into building the titular bridge for Japanese use, while American prisoner William Holden plots to blow it up. David Lean’s 1957 Best Picture winner doesn’t hold up for me as well as some of his other films, but it’s still got legs.

9:00pm / 8:00pm – TCM – This is the Army, Hollywood Canteen, Stage Door Canteen, and Thousands Cheer
None of these are good movies, let’s state that up front. But they’re a special genre of Hollywood war effort films featuring tons of cameos by famous stars, which makes them an interesting snapshot into the studio system of the time. This is the Army is based on an Irving Berlin Broadway revue, which donated virtually all of its box office returns to the war effort. Hollywood Canteen and Stage Door Canteen are named after famous USO locations in Hollywood and New York, respectively. Thousands Cheer is more story-oriented, but ends with a revue featuring numbers by Judy Garland, Virginia O’Brien, June Allyson, and others. The other one I would’ve put in this programme is Thank Your Lucky Stars, notable mostly because it makes Warner dramatic stars like Bette Davis and Ann Sheridan try to sing, which is just unavoidably amusing.

Wednesday, 12 November

10:00pm / 9:00pm – TCM – Strangers on a Train
Farley Granger meets Robert Walker on a train and jokes with him about exchanging murders – Granger’s unloved wife (who is in the way of Granger’s love for Ruth Roman) for Walker’s tyrannical father. Except Walker wasn’t joking. One of Hitchcock’s most intense films, with some of his most memorable shots and set-pieces (carousel, anyone?).

10:00pm / 9:00pm – Sundance – This is England
Shane Meadows’ film about a young boy in 1980s Britain becoming involved with skinheads got outstanding reviews from all quarters last year. I missed it in theatres, but definitely want to get a shot at it now.

1:30am / 12:30am (13th) – TCM – Blowup
In Michelangelo Antonioni’s first English-language film, a London photographer thinks he may have captured a murder on film, but he can’t be quite sure. What might have been a routine detective story becomes something else – a mystery without an answer. Related in a way to surveillance ethics stories like The Conversation, Antonioni brings his detached intellectualism to the film, making it quite unlike most anything else ever made.

Thursday, 13 November

9:45am / 8:45am – IFC – Amarcord
One of Federico Fellini’s four Best Foreign Film statuettes is for this film, and though I rail against many of Oscar’s choices when it comes to foreign films, Fellini deserved all of his. Amarcord is a slice-of-life film showcasing a small 1930s Italian village, with Fellini’s typically flair. [Playing again on the 14th at 5:50am EST]

11:00am / 10:00am – AMC – The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Sergio Leone’s most definitive spaghetti western finishes off his “Man with No Name” trilogy starring Clint Eastwood. It’s not necessary to see the other two entries (A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More) first.

12:45pm / 11:45am – TCM – The Shop Around the Corner
The original version of You’ve Got Mail has James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan as feuding employees of a shop who are unknowingly exchanging romantic letters. Ernst Lubitsch directs, bringing his warm European wit to bear.

8:00pm / 7:00pm – AMC – Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Remember when Steven Spielberg liked aliens? Contrary to many opinions, I think, I prefer Close Encounters to E.T. Maybe it’s the fact that the aliens communicate with such a distinctive musical phrase. I don’t know.

Friday, 14 November

9:30am / 8:30am – AMC – Pillow Talk
More recent movies have tried to replicate Pillow Talk‘s combination of innocence and sex (notably the near-remake Down With Love), but I haven’t found any that manage with the aplomb of the original. Accept no imitators!

4:00pm / 3:00pm – TCM – Rear Window
My all-time favorite film. Hitchcock, Stewart, Kelly, voyeurism, fashion, murder, paranoia, sarcastic nurses, I can’t get enough. Ever.

3:45am / 2:45am (15th) – TCM – The Haunting (1963)
There’s The Haunting and then there’s The Haunting. And this is the good one, not the overblown 1999 remake. Robert Wise’s original is creepy, disturbing, and, like, good.

Saturday, 15 November

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – Paths of Glory
In this early Stanley Kubrick film, soldier Kirk Douglas has to decide what to do when three of his men are charged with cowardice (a capitol offense) for refusing to obey orders to make a suicidal charge at the enemy. The film is not only an historical exploration of the shift from pre-WWI tactics to post-machine gun tactics, but also a pointed inquiry into military ethics.

8:00pm / 7:00pm – AMC – The Godfather
If AMC is still doing commercial breaks in their movies, don’t watch The Godfather now. But sometime. Somewhere. Even if it’s just to say you have, like it is for me. Someday I’m going to watch it and actually love it. [Playing again on the 17th at 7:00am and 4:00pm EST]

11:30pm / 10:30pm – TCM – Kiss Me Deadly
I actually didn’t love this well-respected hard-boiled noir film as much as I wanted to when I saw it last year, but I’m throwing it in here because it is reasonably solid, and one of those films you have to see to count yourself a competent film noir fan. If, you know, being a competent film noir fan is on your shortlist of things to do with your life. Which it is for me.

12:00am / 11:00pm – AMC – The Godfather Part II
See above re: The Godfather. Except one of my shames as a film buff is that I’ve never seen Part II. I sort of doubt I’m going to on AMC, though, just throwing out the possibility to you. I’m shooting for the new Coppola Restoration DVDs. [Playing again on the 17th at 11:30am and 8:00pm EST]

4:30am / 3:30am (17th) – AMC – The Usual Suspects
“The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing people he didn’t exist.” And The Usual Suspects pulls a similar trick, placing it forever on the list of greatest twist films ever.

Sunday, 17 November

8:00am / 7:00am – IFC – The Seventh Seal
Ingmar Bergman dramatizes an actual chess game between a medieval knight (Bergman regular Max von Sydow) and Death. Heavy stuff, not that that’s unusual for Bergman.

9:45am / 8:45am – IFC – The Virgin Spring
One of Bergman’s I haven’t yet gotten around to seeing – maybe because the description “Swineherds seek shelter with the father of a girl they raped and killed” (from IFC’s site) sounds even more depressing than usual for Bergman? But I intend to see all of his eventually, so its time will come.

10:00pm / 9:00pm – Sundance – Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels
Every time I see this frenetic Guy Ritchie crime comedy, I like it a little more. A young man gets into a gambling debt that his casino-running father refuses to bail him out of, so he hatches a poorly-planned scheme to steal and sell some priceless antique shotguns. Add in some other hoods working on other crimes and a few hitmen running around, and pretty soon the whole thing spirals out of control. Add in cockney accents and you’ve got a zany good time that’s hard to beat.

2:00am / 1:00am (18th) – TCM – Diabolique
A man’s wife and his lover plot together to kill him, but get a surprise when he shows back up soon after. Ghost? Madness? Who can say? Taut thriller from Henri-Georges Clouzot.

Featured Video: Tribute to Kubrick, and more

barringer82 over on YouTube has a bunch of compilation videos of different directors and time periods. This one is to Stanley Kubrick, of 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, The Shining, Eyes Wide Shut, and many, many other which feature in this video. Plus, it’s really well put together; someday when I get good video editing software, this is the sort of thing I’d love to do in my spare time, though I doubt I have the patience to do it this well. I also recommend the ones for David Lynch, Wes Anderson, and The Coen Brothers, and I’m sure all the rest are good, too, but I haven’t had time to watch them all. via kottke.

March Reading/Watching Recap

I’m a month behind again! Hey, I’ve been putting more effort into watching and reading than writing. (No, really. I’ve been busting through my goals pretty well this year. I’m practicing for grad school, when I hear I’ll have half as much time to do twice as much work. We’ll see.)

Also, some day I’m going to write about something other than movies and books. Really. I promise.

Reactions, not reviews, blah blah blah jaffacakes.

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