Tag Archives: Raging Bull

Film on TV: March 16-23

Monday, March 16

5:00am – TCM – Henri Langlois: Phantom of the Cinematheque
If you like American film since about 1970 or French film since the 1950s, then take a minute to thank Henri Langlois, founder of the Cinematheque Française in Paris. He showed American films from the 1940s, Italian Neo-Realist films, European artsy films, anything he could get his hands on, and fed a love of cinema to the writers and filmmakers who would lead the Nouvelle Vague in France, which in turn would influence the New Hollywood of the ’70s. Without Langlois, there’s no Truffaut, no Godard, no Chabrol, no Rivette, but also no Scorsese, no Bogdanovich, no Coppola, etc. This fascinating documentary follows the ups and downs of the great cinematic hero.

2:30pm – IFC – Raging Bull

8:00pm – TCM – The Navigator
I can’t remember if I’ve seen this Buster Keaton film or not, but it’s Buster Keaton. Therefore it’s worthwhile.

9:30pm – TCM – The Brain That Wouldn’t Die
A cult classic of the first degree. There’s even a Mystery Science Theatre 3000 version, if you’d rather seek that one out.

1:15am (17th) – TCM – Frenzy
One of Hitchcock’s last films, made in 1972 when many of the content rules had been lifted and he could be a lot more explicit than he previously could. And he is, in a somewhat lurid story of the Necktie Killer, a serial killer terrorizing London with failed rape attempts and successful murders.

Tuesday, March 17

6:45pm – IFC – A Hard Day’s Night
Sorta musical, sorta comedy, sorta documentary, sorta concert film, all Beatles, and all fantastic.
(repeats 7:50am and 1:30pm on the 18th)

8:00pm – TCM – The Quiet Man

Wednesday, March 18

8:15am – TCM – Holiday
Besides Bringing Up Baby, Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn also made this film in 1938, and though it isn’t as well known and possibly hasn’t aged as well, it’s still well worth watching, not least of all for the great supporting turns by Lew Ayres (All Quiet on the Western Front) and Gail Patrick.

10:00am – TCM – Top Hat

8:00pm – IFC – The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
(repeats 1:45am on the 19th)

10:00pm – IFC – The Royal Tenenbaums
(repeats 3:45am on the 19th)

12:00M – IFC – This Film Is Not Yet Rated
Documentary about the abuses of the MPAA ratings board gets a little sensationalist at times, but still manages to bring up very good points about the ratings system’s fallibility and arbitraryness.

Thursday, March 19

6:00am – TCM – Dark Victory

7:15am – IFC – Picnic at Hanging Rock
(repeats at 12:45pm)

6:05pm – Sundance – Avenue Montaigne

6:25pm – IFC – Trainspotting

9:30pm – IFC – Moulin Rouge!
(repeats 11:50 am on the 20th)

11:45pm – IFC – Dogville
Lars von Trier specializes in making difficult films, and Dogville is difficult both stylistically and thematically, and many people hate it. Love isn’t quite the right word for the emotion I have towards it, either, but it remains one of the most powerfully impactful films I’ve ever seen. Not to mention it has what is quite possibly Nicole Kidman’s greatest performance (and I love Nicole, so I don’t mean that sarcastically).

Friday, March 20

9:15am – TCM – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

4:15pm – TCM – Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

5:45pm – IFC – Stage Beauty
Sometime around Shakespeare’s time, theatrical convention changed from having all female parts played by males on stage to allowing women to perform female roles themselves. Caught in this shift were the effeminate men who had made their careers and indeed, their identities, out of playing women. Stage Beauty is about one such man and his crisis of self when he no longer had a professional or personal identity. It’s a fascinating film in many ways.

6:15pm – TCM – Freaky Friday (1978)
Jodie Foster as a kid who switches bodies with her mom! Gotta love it.

2:30am (21st) – TCM – Two-Lane Blacktop
Fiercely independent road picture – a sort of Easy Rider but with cars, less plot, and no stars.

Saturday, March 21

3:30pm – TCM – The Caine Mutiny

1:00am (22nd) – TCM – Oklahoma!

Sunday, March 22

6:00am – TCM – The Roaring Twenties
One of James Cagney’s classic gangster pictures.

8:00am – TCM – Angels With Dirty Faces
Another of James Cagney’s classic gangster pictures, this time with kids and a priest thrown in.

6:15pm – IFC – Wassup Rockers
I watched this last time it was on IFC, and quite liked it. Small, intimate little film about a group of teenage Latino skateboarders from South Central LA. They go up to Beverly Hills to skateboard, get caught by cops, escape, meet up with some girls, get in fights with preppy 90210 guys, and try to get home. But the moments that’ll get you are when they’re just talking, to the camera, or to the girls, about their life and what it’s like to live in South Central. The acceptance that one of their older friends was recently shot by a black gang, or the shy recounting of their last experience trying to find a girlfriend. It doesn’t go anywhere, really, but it’s a wonderful slice of life.

12:00M – TCM – Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans

Film on TV: 9-15 March

Okay, I can haz new computer now. It’s a shiny, pretty Macbook that anyone who happens to follow me on Twitter or FriendFeed has already heard WAY too much about. Suffice it to say that it is much more fun writing these on a computer than on an iPhone (finding the greater than/more than symbols for all the html tags got old REAL quick on the phone). Looked like it was gonna be slim pickings this week with TCM’s lineup, but IFC more than picked up the slack.

Monday, March 9th

8:35am – IFC – Diabolique
Henri-Georges Clouzot’s tense thriller about a man whose wife and lover decide to join forces to off him. But there’s another twist beyond that.
(repeats at 2:30pm)

8:00pm – IFC – Day Watch
The sequel to the moody apocalyptic sci-fi film Night Watch from a couple of years ago. Night Watch was far from perfect (way better in concept than in execution, which was quite muddled), but still interesting, and I’m curious to see if Day Watch improved on it. It’s eventually supposed to be a trilogy.
(repeats at 1:30am on the 10th)

12:00M – Sundance – The Death of Mr. Lazarescu
One of the forerunners of Romania’s ongoing New Wave, focused on a spare, minimalist style of realism – my beloved 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days belongs to this movement as well. Lazarescu is an indictment of the Romanian healthcare system, following a dying man as a parademic tries to get him into hospital after hospital over the course of a night.

Tuesday, March 10th

8:30am – IFC – Howl’s Moving Castle
(repeats at 2:05pm)

11:00am – TCM – Detour
If you wanna see some classic B-level film noir, look no further. This is one of the touchstones – you got low-budget, dim lighting, fatalistic anti-hero, femme fatale, the works.

2:45pm – Sundance – Avenue Montaigne
Sweet and unassuming ensemble film, set in Paris. That’s all it takes to hook me.
(repeats at 1:00pm on the 14th)

1:00am (11th) – TCM – The Bridge on the River Kwai

Wednesday, March 11th

10:00am – TCM – Love Me or Leave Me
Doris Day turns in her best performance ever as the abused girlfriend of gangster James Cagney.

Thursday, March 12th

8:00pm – IFC – The Player
Robert Altman. Tim Robbins as a hotshot Hollywood producer who may just get his comeuppance. Virtuosic opening tracking shot.
(repeats at 2:00am on the 13th)

10:15pm – IFC – The Royal Tenenbaums
(repeats at 4:25am on the 13th)

2:00am (13th) – TCM – The Third Man

Friday, March 13th

6:25am – IFC – Picnic at Hanging Rock
I have a love-hate relationship with director Peter Weir, and I’m never sure which side of the fence this film falls on. I don’t really understand it, but it’s stuck in my head for years. I think I’m assigning that to love.
(repeats at 11:40am and 4:55pm)

7:45am – TCM – Blackboard Jungle
One of the first teacher-in-an-inner-city-school films, with a very young Sidney Poitier as one of the unruly students.

9:10am – Sundance – Mutual Appreciation
I actually just watched this today. It’s part of the so-called Mumblecore movement, which is largely associated with a group of New York indie filmmakers including Andrew Bujalski (who directed Mutual Appreciation), Joe Swanberg, Mark and Jay Duplass, Mary and Ronald Bronstein, actress Greta Gerwig, etc. Mumblecore often comes under fire for being pointless and navel-gazing, and sure. It’s that. I’m not even sure I like Mumblecore-labeled films that much, but if you’re interested in seeing some real DIY filmmaking (not what passes for indie in the world of Little Miss Sunshine and Juno), check this one out. It has a bit more plot than some of the others, plus it stars Justin Rice, the lead singer/guitarist/songwriter for Bishop Allen, which is fun.
(repeats at 4:35pm)

2:45pm – TCM – To Sir, With Love
Another teacher film, but this time Sidney Poitier’s the teacher, and the school is in inner-city London.

8:00pm – TCM – Double Indemnity
It’s James M Cain night over at TCM tonight, and all three of these films (this one, Mildred Pierce, and The Postman Always Rings Twice are well worth watching, straddling the film noir-melodrama line perfectly.

10:00pm – TCM – Mildred Pierce

12:00M – TCM – The Postman Always Rings Twice

Saturday, March 14th

9:45am – IFC – Waking Life
It may be a while before you see another film like Richard Linklater’s rotoscoped Waking Life, which doubles as philosophic treatise. It’s one of the most interesting, innovative, and brilliant films of the 21st century.
(repeats at 2:35pm)

4:00pm – TCM – From Here to Eternity

Sunday, March 15th

8:00am – IFC – Cléo from 5 to 7
At the end of last year, I posted a list of the best films I had seen. Cléo from 5 to 7 was at the top of that list. It combines a New Wave sensibility with a female director’s eye, which turned out to be such a perfect combination for me that I haven’t been able to get it out of my head since, and I can’t wait to see it again. And again.

9:35am – IFC – Vagabond
Vagabond is by the same director as Cléo from 5 to 7, Agnès Varda. Haven’t seen it yet, but hope to this time around.
(repeats at 4:15pm)

8:00pm – IFC – Raging Bull

9:45pm – Sundance – A Woman Under the Influence
I still have this John Cassavetes film on my DVR from the last time it was on. I should rectify that at some point.
(repeats at 5:30pm on the 16th)

12:00M – TCM – Nosferatu
F.W. Murnau’s 1922 version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula still ends up being one of the best versions of the story. For a great double feature, watch this and then 2001’s Shadow of the Vampire, a fun little film that wonders if Nosferatu actor Max Shrenk actually WAS a vampire.

Film on TV: March 2-8

I’m going to start shortening these posts up a bit – especially this week, because I’m still on my iPhone, though that should be rectified in the next few days, but also in general. I’m only going to write about the ones that I particularly feel like highlighting, and that I haven’t written about before. To see earlier blurbs about anything, click on the appropriate tag below the post.

Monday, March 2

8:15am – TCM – Foreign Correspondent
A lesser-known but still, of course, worthwhile Hitchcock film.

4:00pm – TCM – Libeled Lady

9:30pm – TCM – The Philadelphia Story

11:30pm – TCM – It Happened One Night

1:30am (3rd) – TCM – Meet John Doe
One of the more corny of Capra’s capracorny films, and not as compelling as most of his others. Still, Barbara Stanwyck.

3:45am (3rd) – TCM – Mr. Deeds Goes to Town

Tuesday, March 3rd

9:05am – IFC – Moulin Rouge!
Baz Luhrmann’s trippy love-it-or-hate-it magnum opus. I happen to love it.
(repeats at 2:30pm)

5:30pm – TCM – Oklahoma!
I can’t even tell you how many times I watched this as a kid. I had it memorized. And it still holds up when I watch it now.

6:45pm – IFC – Waking Life
Richard Linklater’s brilliant animated philosophical meditation. How Linklater can make so many good films that consist entirely of people talking never ceases to amaze me, and this is one of his best.
(repeats at 5:00am on the 4th)

12:15am (4th) – TCM – Key Largo

Wednesday, March 4th

12:00Mid – IFC – Raging Bull
This Scorsese film that won DeNiro an Oscar is one of a two or three shameful gaps in my cinematic knowledge. I blame the boxing, which I avoid, but I’m gonna try this time.
(repeats at 3:30am and 1:00pm on the 5th)

Thursday, March 5th

6:30pm – IFC – Waiting for Guffman
(repeats at 8:20am and 3:15pm on the 6th)

9:30pm – IFC – The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
A Wes Anderson film. That’s my pitch right there, take it or leave it
(repeats at 3:00am on the 6th)

Friday, March 6th

9:45pm – IFC – The Cooler

Saturday, March 7th

1:30pm – TCM – Fort Apache
John Ford + John Wayne + Henry Fonda + a grown up Shirley Temple. Okay, not sure how much of a draw that last thing is, but the first three. Yeah.

6:00pm – TCM – Johnny Guitar
Nicholas Ray films are always worth watching, and this one is a campy Technicolor western starring a tough-talking Joan Crawford. I mean, come on!

8:00pm – TCM – A Night at the Opera
One of the best Marx Brothers films, and the romantic subplot is only halfway distracting.

8:00pm – IFC – The Royal Tenenbaums
Another Wes Anderson film, and his most brilliant, if you ask me.
(repeats at 10:05am on the 8th)

10:00pm – IFC – Clerks
Kevin Smith’s first film, before he had, like, a budget. Which actually works for him.
(repeats at 3:55am on the 8th)

Sunday, March 8th

8:00am – TCM – Pygmalion
The non-musical version of My Fair
Lady
. Well, technically it’s the other way around, but whatever.

8:00am – IFC – Wild Strawberries
One of Ingmar Bergman’s most celebrated films, and one which I have sadly not seen yet.

9:35am – IFC – The Silence
The third in Ingmar Bergman’s “faith” trilogy. They don’t really need to be watched in order.

10:00am – TCM – The More the Merrier

12:00N – TCM – The Women

9:45pm – IFC – The Pianist
Adrien Brody won an Oscar for his role in this Holocaust drama.
(repeats 4:00am on the 9th)

2:00am (9th) – TCM – Tokyo Story
Yasujiro Ozu is one of the most highly- praised Japanese filmmakers, and this is the film you hear about the most. To be honest, I’ve tried to watch it a couple of times, but haven’t been able to get into it. But I’m determined to rectify that.

4:30am (9th) – TCM – The Magnificent Ambersons
Orson Welles’ follow-up to Citizen Kane obviously isn’t as great a masterpiece, but is still pretty darn good, despite studio interference.

Film on TV: January 12-18

Monday, January 12

7:30am / 6:30am – IFC – The Seventh Seal
One of Ingmar Bergman’s better-known films, though I don’t like it as much as some of his others. I guess the image of a medieval knight playing chess with Death is an image that’s hard to get out of your head, though.
(repeats 12:35pm EST)

9:15am / 8:15am – IFC – American Splendor
Paul Giamatti burst on the scene with this film about unconventional comic book artist Harvey Pekar. It’s an appropriately offbeat, funny, cynical, and yet warm film.
(repeats 2:35pm EST)

Tuesday, January 13

2:00am / 1:00am (14th) – TCM – Annie Hall
TCM’s playing this, one of Woody Allen’s best, a lot lately, and that’s not a bad thing. Must See

Wednesday, January 14

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – The Apartment
Also a frequent TCM film, but always worth another look. Tonight it’s part of a Jack Lemmon-Billy Wilder marathon. Must See

10:15pm / 9:15pm – TCM – Some Like It Hot
But if you only see one Jack Lemmon-Billy Wilder film, see this one. If you only see one Marilyn Monroe film, see this one (or Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, but I digress). If you only see one Tony Curtis film…you get the idea. Must See

Thursday, January 15

12:30am / 11:30am – TCM – Double Indemnity
And if you only see one Billy Wilder film, see THIS one. :) Still one of the most iconic and definitive film noirs ever made (seriously, when people ask you “what is film noir, anyway,” you could almost just say Double Indemnity – almost). Also provides Barbara Stanwyck another chance to be AWESOME. Must See

2:30am / 1:30am (16th) – TCM – Shaft
The original black private eye who got all the ladies. There was a huge wave of African-American-centric films in the 1970s (so-called blaxploitation films), and Shaft is one of the first and one of the best.

4:15am / 3:15am (16th) – TCM – The Big Sleep
I think I’ve already highlighted this one a few times since I started this post series. I don’t care. This is one of my favorite movies, the best hard-boiled detective film ever made, one of Humphrey Bogart’s best roles, and the best pairing of Bogart and Lauren Bacall. It’s full of win any way you look at it. Must See

Friday, January 16

6:15am / 5:15am – TCM – Thousands Cheer
There’s nothing particularly special about Thousands Cheer, a fairly routine 1943 war-time musical, except that it ends with a spectacular revue of MGM stars including June Allyson, Frank Sinatra (both in probably their first or second screen appearance), Virginia O’Brien, pianist Jose Iturbi, Judy Garland, and the actual stars of the picture, Gene Kelly and Kathryn Grayson.

6:20am / 5:20am – IFC – Fanny and Alexander
One of Ingmar Bergman’s later films; I haven’t seen it yet, but hopefully this will be the time that my DVR decides not to randomly delete it before I watch it. I know it’s about a couple of kids, which is an unusual subject for Bergman, but I’ve heard so many good things about it I can’t wait.
(repeats 12:25pm EST)

8:30am / 7:30am – TCM – National Velvet
Being as how I grew up loving old movies AND horses, I probably don’t need to state that I pretty much wore out my tape of National Velvet. It’s one of the greatest kid-friendly films in existence, with a young Elizabeth Taylor and an exciting horse race. Ah, good times.

Saturday, January 17

4:00pm / 3:00pm – TCM – Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Paul Newman and Robert Redford in one of those late 1960s revisionist westerns that managed to simultaneously revitalize a genre whose traditional values were out of step with the times and kill the genre for future filmmakers. Well, that aside, Butch Cassidy is a great film any way you cut it.

8:00pm / 7:00pm – TCM – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
What do you do when you’re seven brothers in the backwoods and need wives? Why, go kidnap them of course! Patriarchal values aside, Seven Brides is one of the most entertaining movie musicals ever made, and I defy anyone to outdo the barn dance/raising scene.

8:00pm / 7:00pm – IFC – Raging Bull
It’s a huge black mark on my cinephile record that I haven’t seen Raging Bull, widely acclaimed as a high point (or maybe THE high point) in the careers of both Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro. Situation will hopefully soon be rectified.
(repeats 1:30am EST and 11:30am EST on the 18th)

Sunday, January 18

6:00am / 5:00am – TCM – Arsenic and Old Lace
The Brewster sisters are kindly old ladies – even if they are poisoning lonely old gentleman callers. As an act of kindness! Such is the premise of one of the screwiest of all comedies, which never lets up on the hilarity. Cary Grant turns in one of his most sustained comic performances, and even the usually quite serious Peter Lorre gets in on the fun.

10:15am / 9:15am – TCM – Notorious
One of Alfred Hitchcock’s best films (and if you know how I feel about Hitchcock, that’s saying a lot), and one of the greatest spy films ever. Spy Cary Grant recruits Ingrid Bergman because of her relationship with suspected enemy spy Claude Rains – but how far is she willing to go? Simply fantastic on every level. Must See

12:35am / 11:35am – TCM – The Cameraman
Buster Keaton works as a cameraman on a film to try to get closer to the attractive leading lady. I’ve seen this years ago, and remember enjoying it quite a lot. Plus, any chance to see Keaton is a chance worth taking.